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Music Review: Everything Will Be Alright in the End

weezer3-608x611Shrewsbury, Massachusetts-It’s been a long time since Weezer was really on the scene. It’s only been four years since the release of Hurley, but in the music industry that can be an eternity. With a string of hits, the band saw a sudden decline with the last two albums and they didn’t release much for a long time. People didn’t care anymore about them anymore. There was a period where they seemed washed up. Then, Rivers Cuomo and company went back into the studio and started working on their next record, and to make sure that no one else would balk at them, they brought on producer Ric Ocasek, who produced two of their biggest successes.

From the moment Everything Will Be Alright in the End starts, you can tell that Weezer is crawling its way back to the top. The rousing “Ain’t Got Nobody” kicks the album off to a stunning start and there’s a part of you that feels how badly these boys want to be good again. The second track, “Back to the Shack” is essentially a four-minute long apology Cuomo gives for leading the band off the beaten path. These two songs and “Eulogy For a Rock Band” form the first trio of the album, which seems to be dealing with Cuomo’s attempt to reconcile with the masses.

Then “Lonely Girl” kicks off the largest section of songs, dealing more with Cuomo’s issues he’s had with women. This leads to “The British Are Coming” and “Da Vinci,” which feature some more of that classic Weezer sound that could have come off of something like The Green Album or Pinkerton. However, the standout in this section is “Go Away,” which features the incredible talents of Best Coast’s Bethany Cosentino. This track compliments the best parts of both bands and it is a stunning track.

The next tracks, “Cleopatra” and “Foolish Father” comes after that to deal more with Cuomo’s issues with his father and the album comes to a nice cap with the “The Futurescope Trilogy,” though it’s place at the end of the album doesn’t quite fit as well as “Foolish Father” would have. Regardless, Weezer’s ninth album screams of a band trying to work through their problems in the past and going back to what they do best. There was a period where Weezer fell a little astray and got a little too self-indulgent with some of their work and that showed a dip in quality. However, with this album, they are planning to come back with a vengeance and they deserve it.

There’s something about that title Everything Will Be Alright in the End that evokes something out of you. The phrase starts and ends (technically) the album and really thematically ties the whole album together, which hasn’t happened since Pinkerton. These songs are dealing with a lot of emotionally trying things such as commercial, romantic, and professional failure. Yet, there is that element of hope at the end of it all that things won’t be as bad as they seem. That despite all the horrible things that life throws at you, things will work themselves out. As clichéd of a thing that is to say, Weezer manages not only bring that feeling out, but also make you believe it.

Everything Will Be Alright in the End is the best Weezer album since Make Believe and even arguably since Pinkerton. Cuomo and company have presented a remarkable set of tracks that go back to their classic sound, yet tie perfectly together into a succinct and emotional package. A band that a lot of people turned their backs on has returned with full force and they are sticking to their guns. Weezer has presented a new path they intend to walk down and for once, it looks like a step in the right direction.

Notable Tracks: Ain’t Got Nobody, Back to the Shack, Go Away, Cleopatra

Everything Will Be Alright in the End is available wherever music is sold.

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